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French grammar - To go - the verb aller

To go - the verb aller

The verb aller means 'to go'. It is classified as an -ER-type verb due to its -er ending.

Its present tense conjugations are as follows:

je vais - 'I go'

tu vas - 'you (familiar) go'

il & elle va - 'he goes' or 'she goes'

nous allons - 'we go'

vous allez - 'you (plural)' or 'you (formal) go'

ils & elles vont - 'they go'

Note that the present tense in French could mean the simple present (eg. 'I go everyday') or the present continuous (eg, 'I am going at the moment').

Examples:
je vais
I go / I am going
tu vas
you (informal) go / you are going
il va
he goes / he is going
elle va
she goes / she is going
nous allons
we go / we are going
nous n'allons pas
we do not go / we are not going
vous allez
you (plural or formal) go / you are going
ils vont
they go / they are going
elles vont
they (females) go / they are going
Jacques va.
Jacques goes/is going.
Jean et Alexandre vont.
Jean and Alexandre go/are going.
Ça va ?
How goes it? / How are you?

A very common greeting - literally 'it goes?'

ça means 'it' or 'this'

Ça va bien ?
It is going well?

Literally 'it goes well?'

bien means 'well' or 'fine'

Oui, ça va.
Yes, it goes fine. / Yes, I am well.
Non, ça ne va pas.
No, it is not going well.
Où allez-vous ?
Where are you going?

means both 'where' (location) and 'to where' (destination)

Où vont-elles ?
Where are they (females) going?
Pourquoi vas-tu ?
Why are you going?
Je vais avec Alec.
I'm going with Alec.